Menu & Search
           1904556600
Speak to our friendly team
Contact Us Now

The government has recently suggested that the four-hour A&E target for waiting times might be abolished.

Despite some positive statistics with the policy, recent comments from the Health Secretary Matt Hancock suggest a change after an ongoing review into NHS clinical targets. This review has released an interim report suggesting that there will be four areas of focus for the new target: the time to initial clinical assessment, the time to emergency treatment for severe patients, the mean waiting time target calculated across all patients, and the utilisation of ‘Same Day Emergency Care’ to avoid overnight admissions.

Specifically, Mr Hancock, told BBC Radio 5 Live, assumingly after the NHS received its worst waiting times this winter since the target began in 2004, that ministers should be judged by “the right target” and a “clinically appropriate” one was needed. Currently, the proportion of patients attending major A&E departments in England that were seen within four hours has been at its lowest ever, having only managed to treat and then admit, transfer or discharge 68.6% of arrivals, far below the 95% that minsters say should be dealt with.

But, is it really that bad? Recent data involved with the distribution of A&E waiting times in 2011-12 and 2012-13, showed that during a period where hospitals were meeting targets for all patients in major NHS hospitals, that waiting times spiked before the four hours, with more than 10% of patients being admitted discharged or transferred to another hospital in the final 10 minutes before reaching the target. This, in contrast, creates a sharp decline after the four hours and is estimated that the target reduced waiting times by approximately 20 minutes.

Significantly the target has led to other benefits and impacts for the NHS, such as a 12% increase in the number of inpatient admissions as well as the extra visits increasing the average patient cost by £95, a 5% increase on an average cost of around £1,900.

Patients also have benefited from the policy by managing to reduce 30-day patient mortality by 14%, but with this in mind, it begs the question as to what is saving these lives – lower waiting times or extra admissions? A working paper from the IFS (Institute for Fiscal Studies) reveals that whilst there is no relationship between admissions and deaths, there are some that suggest that it is the bigger reductions in wait times that are associated with the larger mortality.

But what does this all mean for the proposed changes to the target? It’s fair to say that the four-hour target has played a pivotal role in improving A&E care since it was introduced. However, in light of recent performances over the past winter, no way does this mean that the NHS care can’t be better, the recent delays and compromises of service evidence this, but for every change they make or every scheme they draft, there needs to be a thorough thought process going into the design of any alternative targets introduced.

The benefits of the current target, in terms of mortality, are mainly a result of them being time-sensitive patients, many of which will also be included in the list of priority patients, therefore focusing the attention on these patients (including conditions such as sepsis, heart attack and stroke) could perhaps achieve even greater reductions in mortality than realised under the current policy. With that said, there is still little evidence for what the ‘right’ target time would look like to maximise the patient outcomes as well as one that would be acceptable for them. The one thing that will be guaranteed is that it will be highly disputed as we wait among further details to emerge.

If you know someone who’s treatment has been significantly compromised due to a delay in diagnosis, speak to our experts to find out how you can make a compensation claim.

Start Your Claim Today1904556600
Tell us about your case

Just send us a little bit about yourself and your claim and we will respond within 24 hours.

Get In Touch
Latest News

Covid-Friendly Cancer Treatment

NHS England appears to be responding to the growing concerns over delays to cancer treatment during the coronavirus pandemic. NHS England are investing £160m […]

Read More

Welsh Government Accused of Neglecting Patients

The Welsh Conservatives have accused the Labour-led Welsh government of neglecting patients. This comes after a Freedom of Information request reveals that more than […]

Read More

Negligent Approach to Social Care in the Pandemic

A report has accused government of a “slow, inconsistent, and at times negligent approach” to social care in the COVID-19 pandemic. The Public Accounts […]

Read More

Take a look back through our complete news archive

Follow us on Twitter

Robyn Hawxby, Partner at Pryers, is "adept at advising claimants on birth and brain injury cases, including cerebral palsy claims. She has a strong knowledge of issues regarding failure to diagnose and negligent care", as described in @ChambersGuides

The Highway Code is being updated to provide more protection to vulnerable road users.

https://www.pryers.co.uk/review-of-the-highway-code-to-improve-safety-how-you-can-respond/

Load More...